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Remembering the Apollo 11 Moonwalk

Feature Photo:  Apollo 11 flies towards Earth's orbit with the American flag in the foreground.
Written by Joseph Decibus

49 years ago today, NASA realized the celestial dream of President John F. Kennedy to make the United States of America the first country to land men on the Moon.

When JFK revealed his aim to Congress in 1961, Gene Kranz, a NASA Flight Director was a bit taken aback. “It seemed, at the moment, like a pipe dream…” he said in his book Failure is not an Option:  Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond.  His disbelief was understandable since NASA had not even put a man into Earth’s orbit.  And yet Kranz and his teams of engineers and astronauts would soon come to embrace JFK’s dream, dedicate themselves to achieving it, and would make it happen eight years later when the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin landed the Eagle on the Moon on July 20, 1969.

And so we commemorate this incredible moment for our nation, for space exploration, and for humankind with a series of pictures of the Apollo 11 voyage.

Apollo 11 Saturn V on the Transporter
A monster of a machine called a Spacecraft Transport Vehicle carried the Apollo 11 for about 5 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building in Kennedy Space Center to the launch pad. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V Liftoff
At 9:32 a.m. EDT on July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 Saturn V lifts off from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A. with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. aboard. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V Climbs Toward Orbit
In 2 1/2 minutes of powered flight, the S-IC booster lifts the vehicle to an altitude of about 39 miles some 55 miles downrange. This photo was taken with a 70mm telescopic camera mounted in an Air Force EC-135N plane. [Photo Courtesy of NASA]
The Moon as Seen from Apollo 11
On July 19, Neil Armstrong announces the following to Mission Control in Houston "The view of the Moon that we've been having recently is really spectacular. It's about three-quarters of the hatch window and, of course, we can see the entire circumference, even though part of it is in complete shadow and part of it's in earth-shine. It's a view worth the price of the trip." [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Inspects the Lunar Module
Prior to descending from the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, the astronauts checked functions in the Lunar Module Eagle. The Eagle would carry them to the Moon's Sea of Tranquility area. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle in Landing Configuration
The LM was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions under the landing pods are lunar surface sensing probes. Upon contact with the lunar surface, the probes sent a signal to the crew to shut down the descent engine. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Command and Service Module Columbia
The Apollo 11 Command and Service Module orbiting the Moon with only astronaut Michael Collins aboard as seen from the Lunar Module Eagle. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Buzz Aldrin Leaves the Eagle
Aldrin would follow Neil Armstrong out onto the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. [Photo courtesy of NASA.]
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, stands on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module Eagle, during the Apollo 11 moonwalk. Astronaut Neil Armstrong, mission commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Astronaut Aldrin Setting Up Test Equipment on the Moon
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin locates a deployment site for the laser reflector and passive seismometer and then sets them up 14 and 19 meters, respectively, south of the Lunar Module. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The East Crater
The magnificent desolation of the Moon's Sea of Tranquility. The East Crater is about 30 meters wide and 4 meters deep and was so named because it was about 60 meters east of the Lunar Module. The astronauts flew the Eagle safely over the crater. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Astronauts Sit in a Dinghy After Splashdown
Apollo 11 crew and a Navy diver await pickup from the USS Hornet after splashdown on July 24. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V on the Transporter
A monster of a machine called a Spacecraft Transport Vehicle carried the Apollo 11 for about 5 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building in Kennedy Space Center to the launch pad. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V on
A monster of a machine called a Spa...
Apollo 11 Saturn V Liftoff
At 9:32 a.m. EDT on July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 Saturn V lifts off from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A. with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. aboard. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V Li
At 9:32 a.m. EDT on July 16, 1969, ...
Apollo 11 Saturn V Climbs Toward Orbit
In 2 1/2 minutes of powered flight, the S-IC booster lifts the vehicle to an altitude of about 39 miles some 55 miles downrange. This photo was taken with a 70mm telescopic camera mounted in an Air Force EC-135N plane. [Photo Courtesy of NASA]
Apollo 11 Saturn V Cl
In 2 1/2 minutes of powered flight,...
The Moon as Seen from Apollo 11
On July 19, Neil Armstrong announces the following to Mission Control in Houston "The view of the Moon that we've been having recently is really spectacular. It's about three-quarters of the hatch window and, of course, we can see the entire circumference, even though part of it is in complete shadow and part of it's in earth-shine. It's a view worth the price of the trip." [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Moon as Seen from
On July 19, Neil Armstrong announce...
Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Inspects the Lunar Module
Prior to descending from the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, the astronauts checked functions in the Lunar Module Eagle. The Eagle would carry them to the Moon's Sea of Tranquility area. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin I
Prior to descending from the Apollo...
The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle in Landing Configuration
The LM was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions under the landing pods are lunar surface sensing probes. Upon contact with the lunar surface, the probes sent a signal to the crew to shut down the descent engine. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Lunar M
The LM was photographed in lunar or...
The Apollo 11 Command and Service Module Columbia
The Apollo 11 Command and Service Module orbiting the Moon with only astronaut Michael Collins aboard as seen from the Lunar Module Eagle. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Command
The Apollo 11 Command and Service M...
Buzz Aldrin Leaves the Eagle
Aldrin would follow Neil Armstrong out onto the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. [Photo courtesy of NASA.]
Buzz Aldrin Leaves th
Aldrin would follow Neil Armstrong ...
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, stands on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module Eagle, during the Apollo 11 moonwalk. Astronaut Neil Armstrong, mission commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module...
Astronaut Aldrin Setting Up Test Equipment on the Moon
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin locates a deployment site for the laser reflector and passive seismometer and then sets them up 14 and 19 meters, respectively, south of the Lunar Module. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
Astronaut Aldrin Sett
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin locates a dep...
The East Crater
The magnificent desolation of the Moon's Sea of Tranquility. The East Crater is about 30 meters wide and 4 meters deep and was so named because it was about 60 meters east of the Lunar Module. The astronauts flew the Eagle safely over the crater. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The East Crater
The magnificent desolation of the M...
The Apollo 11 Astronauts Sit in a Dinghy After Splashdown
Apollo 11 crew and a Navy diver await pickup from the USS Hornet after splashdown on July 24. [Photo courtesy of NASA]
The Apollo 11 Astrona
Apollo 11 crew and a Navy diver awa...

 

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About the author

Joseph Decibus

Joseph Decibus writes for OneTravel and is also an avid traveler who occasionally writes about his trips. He looks forward to informing readers periodically about interesting places and events throughout the world.

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